Vaccination | Dental Disease | Lyme Disease | Feline Leukemia

Please have your pet vaccinated before bringing them to any grooming facility. Below is a vaccination schedule for certain stages of your pets life. For more information please speak to your veterinarian.

 

Dogs and Puppies

Cats and Kittens

Age Vaccination

Age

Vaccination

5 wks Parvovirus: For Puppies at high risk. Check with your local vet. 7 wks Combination vaccine*: without Chlamydophilia (formerly called Chlamydia)

6 & 9 wks Combination vaccine* without leptospirosis. Coronavirus: where coronavirus is a concern. 10 wks Combination vaccine*: include Chlamydophilia where it is a concern. FeLV: if the kitten is at risk of exposure to an infected cat; blood test prior to vaccination.

12 wks & older Rabies: Given by your local vet (age at vaccination may vary by local laws) 12 wks & older Rabies: (age at vaccination may vary by local laws)

12 & 15 wks Combination vaccine*: include leptospirosis where it is a concern, or if traveling to an area where it occurs. Coronavirus: where coronavirus is a concern. Lyme: where Lyme disease is a concern or traveling to an area where it occurs. 13 wks Combination vaccine*: include Chlamydophilia where it is a concern. FeLV: if the kitten is at risk of exposure to an infected cat

Adult Combination vaccine*: include leptospirosis where it is a concern, or if traveling to an area where it occurs. Coronavirus: where coronavirus is a concern. Lyme: where Lyme disease is a concern or traveling to an area where it occurs. Rabies: given by your local vet. (time interval between vaccinations may vary by local laws) Adult Combination vaccine*: include Chlamydophilia where it is a concern. FeLV: if the kitten is at risk of exposure to an infected cat. Rabies: given by your local vet. (time interval between vaccinations may vary by local laws)

Understanding periodontal disease & prevention

It's estimated that 80% of all pets have dental disease by age three. It's not difficult to tell that your pet may need his teeth cleaned - pet breath may be so bad that a yawn can clear a room! The main causes of bad breath and bad teeth include:

  • feeding your pet soft food or table scraps

  • old age

  • teeth that don't align properly.

Regular cleaning prevents problems in all these cases. We highly recommend and provide tooth brushing with your regularly scheduled grooming.

Q: Why is dental care important for my pet?
A: You are responsible pet owner. You take good care of your pet by feeding them the right food, exercising them regularly and taking them to the vet for an annual wellness exam.

Pets can develop dental disease and other dental problems, just like you. Many of these problems can be avoided by taking your pet to your vet for regular dental checkups and giving your pet dental care at home.

Q: What are the physical signs of dental disease?
A: If your pet has had bad breath or reddened gums, it could be from gingivitis. The process starts when soft plaque hardens into rough tartar. Tartar irritates and inflames the gums. Gingivitis, in turn, can lead to an infection called periodontal disease, which can cause bleeding gums, loss of teeth and infection in the heart or kidneys if not treated.

Commonly though, there are no obvious physical signs of the disease, even when it is advanced. That is why it is so important to have your pet's teeth checked by a vet regularly.


Lyme Disease Information  

Q: What can be done to prevent being bit by a tick?
A: When in tick-infested habitat - wooded and grassy areas - take special precautions to prevent tick bites, such as wearing light-colored clothing (for easy tick discovery) and tucking pants into socks and shirt into pants. Check after every two to three hours of outdoor activity for ticks on clothing or skin. Brush off any ticks on clothing before skin attachment occurs. A thorough check of body surfaces for attached ticks should be done at the end of the day. If removal of attached ticks occurs within 36 hours, the risk of tick-borne infection is minimal.

Repellents can be effective at reducing bites from ticks that can transmit disease. But their use is not without risk of health effects, especially if repellents are applied in large amounts or improperly. Repellents commonly available to consumers contain the active ingredients DEET (N, N-diethyl-m-toluamide), permethrin, or botanical oils. DEET products have been widely used for many years, but have occasionally been associated with health effects. Skin reactions (particularly at DEET concentrations of 50 percent and above) and eye irritation are the most frequently reported health problems. Products containing permethrin are for use on clothing only, not on skin. Rather than acting as a repellent, permethrin kills ticks and insects that come in contact with treated clothes. Permethrin can cause eye irritation. Insect repellents containing botanical oils, such as oil of geranium, cedar, lemongrass, soy or citronella are also available, but there is limited information on their effectiveness and toxicity. If you decide to use a repellent, use only what and how much you need for your situation. In addition:

*Be sure to follow label directions.
 
*Use repellents only in small amounts, avoiding unnecessary repeat application. Try to reduce the use of repellents by dressing in long sleeves and pants tucked into socks or boots. 

*Children may be at greater risk for reactions to repellents, in part, because their exposure may be greater. Do not apply repellents directly to children. Apply to your own hands and then put it on the child. 

*Do not apply near eyes, nose or mouth and use sparingly around ears. Do not apply to the hands of small children. 

*After returning indoors, wash treated skin with soap and water.

 
Q: How should a tick be removed?
A: Grasp the mouthparts with tweezers as close as possible to the attachment (skin) site. Be careful not to squeeze, crush or puncture the body of the tick, which may contain infectious fluids. After removing the tick, thoroughly disinfect the bite site and wash hands. See or call a doctor if there are concerns about incomplete tick removal. Do not attempt to remove ticks by using petroleum jelly, lit cigarettes or other home remedies because these may actually increase the chance of contracting a tick-borne disease.

Q: How do I obtain information on a tick?
A:Tick identification services are available through the New York State Department of Health and some county health departments. The New York State Department of Health Tick Identification Service will tell you the species of the tick, whether it is engorged with blood and, if so, how long it may have been feeding. The Tick Identification Service will also report whether the mouthparts are present (if not, they may have remained in the skin and need to be removed, as you would a splinter). The Tick Identification Service will not tell you whether the tick is infected with disease- causing organisms. There is no charge for this service. 

If you wish to have a tick identified, place it in a small jar containing rubbing alcohol, seal the container to prevent leakage and complete the Tick Identification Submittal Form. Mail the tick in the sealed container, along with the completed submittal form, to the New York State Health Departmentís Tick Identification Service, c/o HVCC Central Receiving, 80 Vandenburgh Avenue, Troy, NY 12180. Once you send a tick to be identified it will not be returned. 

 

For flea and tick protection, we carry Frontline Plus for Dogs, Cats, Puppies and Kittens 8 weeks of age and older


Answers you need to know about Feline Leukemia

Q: What is feline leukemia (FeLV)?
A: This is a serious disease in cats, caused by a virus infection. It's also a complex disease, of which leukemia (cancer of white blood cells) and cancerous tumors are only a small part. Various other related but non-tumorous diseases are also involved.

Q: How could my cat get the disease?
A: Feline Leukemia is spread by direct contact with infected cats. It's usually transmitted in the saliva but low levels of virus can also be found in urine and feces. Licking, biting and sneezing are common forms of transmission. food and water dishes ad litter boxes are likely sources of infections, if healthy cats share then with infected cats.

Q: If my cat has been in contact with other cats, how can I know whether it has been exposed to the virus?
A: The only sure way is to have your pet tested by your vet. Because such a complex of disease problems and symptoms is involved, it's not easy to spot the disease by how your cat looks or acts. However, certain signs - such as long-lasting infections, unexplained weight loss, reduced appetite, swollen glands or gum problems - should alert you to a health problem that warrants a closer look by your vet and possible FeLV testing.

Q: What should I do to prevent my cats from getting the disease in the first place?
A: The most obvious is to limit or eliminate all contact with other cats. This however, isn't always possible or practical. the best solution is to see your vet and have your cat or cats vaccinated with the most effective and safe vaccine available.


Baby Your Baby Pet Grooming  314 Temple Hill Road  New Windsor NY, 12553  (845)-569-0877
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